Safe to operate my generator in the rain? No, moisture exposure ruins it

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GenTent over a generator.

Protecting your generator investment from moisture is critical. — Photo courtesy GenTent

Exposing your generator to water will short it out. Shorting the sensitive electronic controls of your generator can ruin it, just like electrical shock can short you out. Keep your generator dry or risk both.

“The generator is a potential source of electrical shock if misused. Do not expose the generator to moisture, rain or snow. Do not let the generator get wet, and do not operate it with wet hands.” (From the owner’s manual for the Honda EU2000i generator)

There are two rules for generator use:

  • Don’t use it in an enclosed space;
  • Don’t use it in wet weather.

GenTent keeps your generator dry, the electrical panel dry and your extension-cord plugs dry. It protects you from electric shock and keeps your generator safe from damage caused by exposure to moisture.

GenTents are well constructed, well tested, easy to install and work perfectly to keep driving rain out of your generator, eliminating risk of shorts to electronics and you. 

“The GenTent is the culmination of five different designs,” said Mark Carpenter, a former software engineer and inventor/owner of GenTent. “It is easily installed and easily portable. There are 2,000 generators in our database so you know it’s going to fit.

“Think of GenTent as an insurance policy for your generator.”


How do I protect my generator from rain?

There was a time I mocked the need for a generator cover––something like: “Who needs a tent for the generator? I have been running mine in the weather for 10 years.”

I checked my owner’s manual and was surprised to read:

“The generator is a potential source of electrical shock if misused. Do not expose the generator to moisture, rain or snow. Do not let the generator get wet, and do not operate it with wet hands.” (From the owner’s manual for the Honda EU2000i generator)

I re-read the line “Do not expose the generator to moisture, rain, or snow.”

Surely you have seen generators chugging away in the rain and snow. Ignoring manufacturers’ warnings to keep you genset dry creates risk of equipment loss and creates risk of electrocution to anyone near the generator. 

I read again the owner’s manual and installed a GenTent on my Honda Inverter Generator. I will use it every time I set up the generator. You should too.

Check out GenTents at http://www.gentent.com and protect yourself and your investment. See http://www.takeyourgeneratoroutside.com for a reminder about safe generator operation to avoid carbon monoxide exposure.


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