Don’t get crushed—equip a Quadbar

The Quadbar prevents death and serious injuries due to ATV rollovers

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David Sullivan stands next to an ATV with a Quadbar

David Sullivan believes ATVs should be equipped with Crush Protection Devices (CPD) like the Quadbar. — Photo courtesy David Sullivan

If your ATV flips, what happens to you? It’s a serious question worth considering. Most of us think we won’t experience any rollovers while riding. If we did, we’d equip ourselves with something safer than optimism. Like strapping on a seatbelt before going for a drive, outfitting your ATV with a Quadbar is a practical application that comes into play during those “just in case” situations.

Originally designed to safeguard Australian farmers on uneven terrain, the Quadbar is a Crush Protection Device (CPD) designed to form a protective space between the ATV and the ground in the event of a rollover. The Quadbar aims to prevent or reduce rider injuries incurred due to crushing or asphyxiation.

“Implementing Crush Protection Devices on ATVs will help reduce the severity of injury when these vehicles overturn on their occupants,” said David Sullivan, president of Quadbar Industries in Kelowna, B.C. “Rollovers account for at least 60 per cent of ATV incidents and this device will dramatically reduce those numbers. Statistics confirm that recent advancements in technology to reduce the risk during a rollover incident are having an impact on injury and death statistics. In the US, there is on average 800 ATV fatalities and 145 fatalities each year in Canada. The Quadbar has been estimated to reduce deaths by 40 per cent and a solid reduction of serious injuries.”

The Quadbar is on display on an ATV

The Quadbar has been utilized by ATVers in Canada and the USA for seven years and by riders in Australia for 11 years. — Photo courtesy David Sullivan

Quadbars are a logical step to improving the safety record of ATVs. These CPDs are engineered to be effective and easy to deploy. They are specifically constructed to keep an ATVer’s movement’s free and unencumbered.

“The Crush Protection Device could be the difference between life and death, and thus reduce stress and emotional turmoil of families, friends, employers and fellow employees,” Sullivan said. “In the workplace, these devices will help keep company benefit premiums from increasing, as well as reduce the burden on our already strained public health-care system. The long-term reduction of pain and suffering incurred by families, friends and communities associated with debilitating or fatal injuries such as spinal and head injuries cannot be measured. The economical cost certainly can.”


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